Last edited by Brara
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

6 edition of Encoded Archival Description on the Internet found in the catalog.

Encoded Archival Description on the Internet

  • 123 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Haworth Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Education,
  • Internet,
  • Internet - General,
  • Encoded Archival Description (,
  • Computers,
  • Reference,
  • Computer Books: General,
  • Reference - General,
  • Library & Information Science,
  • General,
  • Encoded Archival Description (Document type definition)

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsDaniel V. Pitti (Editor), Wendy M. Duff (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages241
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8152446M
    ISBN 100789013975
    ISBN 109780789013972

      Steven L. Hensen, “Archival Cataloging and the Internet: The Implications and Impact of EAD,” in Daniel V. Pitti and Wendy M. Duff, eds., Encoded Archival Description on the Internet (Binghamton, NY: Haworth Information Press, ): Cited by: 9. Encoded Archival Context - Corporate bodies, Persons and Families (EAC-CPF) is an XML standard for encoding information about the creators of archival materials -- i.e., a corporate body, person or family -- including their relationships to (a) resources (books, collections, papers, etc.) and (b) other corporate bodies, persons and families. The goal is to provide contextual information.

      Archivists and librarians: here is the perfect introduction to archival description and its latest technological applications! Encoded Archival Description on the Internet introduces a variety of perspectives that will assist you in deciding whether EAD is an appropriate tool in Author: Paul Delsalle. Encoded Archival Description (EAD) The Archives & Manuscripts Collections Service offers participating institutions training in implementing, migrating to, and using ArchivesSpace Making Metadata Friendly.

    Encoded Archival Description book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers/5.   Your EAD Primer: Part 1. Author’s Note: Over the last few months, I’ve heard from several archives students that they’ve had trouble gaining experience with Encoded Archival Description (EAD) in their classes. Luckily, EAD is something that students and practitioners can easily teach themselves.


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Encoded Archival Description on the Internet Download PDF EPUB FB2

Encoded Archival Description on the Internet introduces a variety of perspectives that will assist you in Encoded Archival Description on the Internet book whether EAD is an appropriate tool in a given context and, if it is, provides the knowledge you need to begin planning, organizing, and implementing projects and programs in your : Hardcover.

Encoded Archival Description on the Internet introduces a variety of perspectives that will assist you in deciding whether EAD is an appropriate tool in a given context and, if it is, provides the knowledge you need to begin planning, organizing, and implementing projects and programs in your library.

Encoded Archival Description (EAD) is the international metadata transmission standard for hierarchical descriptions of archival records. Developed by the EAD Working Group of the Society of American Archivists and first published inEAD is an Extensible Markup Language (XML) format used by archivists around the globe.

Encoded Archival Description (EAD) 1 is an emerging standard used internationally in an increasing number of archives and manuscripts libraries to encode data describing corporate records and personal papers. The individual descriptions are variously called. This new version of Encoded Archival Description – EAD3 – exists thanks to the efforts and support of many people, but it exists because of the many archivists and repositories around the world that saw the utility of EAD, used it in diverse and inspiring ways, and continue to recognize many ways in which it might work better.

21), Encoded Archival Description (EAD), and Encoded Archival Context (EAC). There are also close connections with Resource Description and Access (RDA) and with standards promulgated by the International Council on Archives (ICA), including International Standard Archival Description—General (ISAD[G]), the InternationalFile Size: 1MB.

The Internet Archive offers o, freely downloadable books and texts. There is also a collection of million modern eBooks that may be borrowed by anyone with a free account.

Borrow a Book Books on Internet Archive are offered in many formats, including DAISY. Internet Archive is a non-profit digital library offering free universal access to books, movies & music, as well as billion archived web pages.

For those who know little about EAD, Encoded Archival Description on the Internet is an excellent introduction from the key individuals who have guided its development. For those already using or familiar with EAD, this book should raise many questions and venues for exploration.

In Encoded Archival Description on the Internet which is dedicated solely to this standard, (Pitty and Duff, ), only one article deals with delivery of EAD encoded archival description to end. Archivists and librarians: here is the perfect introduction to archival description and its latest technological applications Encoded Archival Description on the Internet introduces a variety of perspectives that will assist you in deciding whether EAD is an appropriate tool in a given context and, if it is, provides the knowledge you need to begin planning, organizing, and implementing projects and.

searching of archival information across different repositories. In response to this situation, the archival descriptive standard, Encoded Archival Description (EAD), was developed in the early ’s.

EAD is based on SGMLKML structures yet incorporates and builds onAuthor: Jihyun Kim, Elizabeth Yakel. Encoded Archival Description (EAD) is the international metadata transmission standard for hierarchical descriptions of archival records.

Developed by the EAD Working Group of the Society of American Archivists and first published inEAD is an Extensible Markup Language (XML) format used by archivists around the cturer: Society of American Archivists.

EAD accommodates variations in the length and content of finding aids within and among repositories, and preserves in electronic form the complex, hierarchically structured descriptive information found in archival repositories and registers, while also enabling the documents to be navigated and searched in ways that their printed counterparts cannot.

In the mid s, Encoded Archival Description (EAD) appeared as a revolutionary technology for publishing archival finding aids on the Web.

The author explores whether or not, given the advent of Webthe archival community should abandon EAD and look for something to replace by: 6. Encoded Archival Description on the Internet shows how EAD will not only benefit the public, but also librarians and archivists.

It describes how information professionals will now be able to share easily information about complementary records and collections and to integrate “virtually”collections related by provenance but dispersed administratively or by geographic distance.

Archival description: content and context in search of structure / Kent M. Haworth --The development and structure of the Encoded Archival Description (EAD) document type definition / Janice E.

Ruth --Stargazing: locating EAD in the descriptive firmament / Michael J. Fox --Archival cataloging and the Internet: the implications and impact of.

Encoded archival description on the internet Article in Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 54(9) July with 10 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Published Resources Details Book Section Author Haworth, K. Title Archival Description: Content and Context in Search of Structure In Encoded Archival Description on the Internet Editors D.

Pitti and W. Duff Imprint Haworth Press, New York, Related Published Resources isReferencedBy. Encoded Archival Description on the Internet. Edited by Daniel V. Pitti and Wendy M. Duff. Binghamton, NY: The Haworth Information Press ; pp. Price: $ (ISBN: 0‐‐‐3.) Dale A. Stirling [email protected]*, * Intertox, Inc., Elliott Avenue, SuiteSeattle, WA Archival description enjoys a long history of use.

As most readers know. This document provides a history of the development of the Encoded Archival Description DTD, from its beginnings as a University of California, Berkeley project to its current release as a developing international standard for finding aids.

The DTD was developed by the archival community. The standard is maintained by the Library of Congress.Iris Xie PhD, Krystyna K. Matusiak PhD, in Discover Digital Libraries, Encoded Archival Description (EAD) Encoded Archival Description (EAD) is an international standard for encoding finding aids for archival materials, with version published in and revised in The standard originated from a research project at the University of California at Berkeley.Encoded Archival Description on the Internet shows how EAD will not only benefit the public, but also librarians and archivists.

It describes how information professionals will now be able to easily share information about complementary records and collections and to “virtually” integrate collections related by provenance but dispersed administratively or by geographic distance.